Monday, April 24, 2017

Ethiopia: Thousands hit by outbreak of acute watery diarrhoea during worst drought for decades

A massive outbreak of acute watery diarrhoea is sweeping through Doolo zone, in Ethiopia’s Somali region, exacerbated by one of the worst droughts in 30 years. In response, teams from Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) are working alongside Ethiopian health authorities to bring the outbreak under control, while warning that more external funding and resources are urgently needed to stop the disease from spreading further.

Officially declared on 7 April, the outbreak has affected more than 16,000 people in the whole region since the start of the year, with about 3,500 new cases per month, according to local authorities. The government has so far deployed over 1,200 health professionals, including nurses and doctors, and set up 100 centres to treat people with the disease. Even if an overall decline in acute watery diarrhoea numbers is registered in the region, the risk of re-infection remains high.

Despite all efforts, MSF teams working in some of worst affected locations in Doolo zone of the Somali region say that there are still serious shortages of infrastructure – such as boreholes, pumps, trucks to transport water, and storage tanks for safe drinking water – and a lack of international organisations responding to the emergency.

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Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Report: 669 killed in Ethiopia violence since August

The Ethiopian government is not giving sufficient attention for what they said and they tried to justify the killing of innocent people and they are boasting because they stopped by killing maybe over 5000 people but they reported only 669 people. Ethiopians hated them, it is a matter of time and they will pay for their crime against humanity and their sponsors the western nations cooperating with them by covering up their crime and I believe Ethiopians freedom is on the hands of anyone any more… I definitely will not surprised if a lot of armed struggle mushroom everywhere in Ethiopia


Government-backed report comes after independent rights groups are denied access to conduct probe into violence.


Almost 700 people have been killed during violence in Ethiopia since August 2016, a government-sponsored commission has said, bringing the total death toll since the unrest began in late 2015 to more than 900.

Ethiopia declared six months of emergency rule in October after almost a year of anti-government violent protests in its Oromia, Amhara and SNNP regions. In March, the measure was extended by four months amid reports of continuing violence in some remote areas.

The Ethiopian Human Rights Commission - mandated by parliament to investigate the violence - presented its long-awaited findings on Tuesday.

The commission blamed a lot of the violence on opposition groups, saying that security forces in some places had no choice but to respond with lethal force.

"The violence happened because the protesters were using guns and so security forces had no other option," Addisu Gebregziabher, the commission's head, told members of parliament.

The report, the second by the commission, said police used "proportionate force" in most areas during the unrest, but could have provided better security during the rallies.

Monday, April 17, 2017

“We Can’t Protest So We Pray”: Anguish in Amhara During Ethiopia’s State of Emergency

By James Jeffrey

“Now it’s the fasting period before Easter, so people are praying even more and saying: Where are you God?

BAHIR DAR, Apr 17 2017 (IPS) - As dawn breaks in Bahir Dar, men prepare boats beside Lake Tana to take to its island monasteries the tourists that are starting to return.

Meanwhile, traffic flows across the same bridge spanning the Blue Nile that six months ago was crossed by a huge but peaceful protest march.

But only a mile farther the march ended in the shooting of unarmed protesters by security forces, leaving Bahir Dar stunned for months.

Events last August in the prominent Amhara cities of Bahir Dar (the region’s capital) and Gonder (the former historical seat of Ethiopian rule) signalled the spreading of the original Oromo protests to Ethiopia’s second most populace region.

By October 9, following further disasters and unrest, the ruling Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front party declared a six-month state of emergency, which was extended at the end of this March for another four months.

On the surface, the state of emergency’s measures including arbitrary arrests, curfews, bans on public assembly, and media and Internet restrictions appear to have been successful in Amhara.

Now shops are open and streets are busy, following months when the cities were flooded with military personal, and everyday life ground to a halt as locals closed shops and businesses in a gesture of passive resistance.

Speaking to residents, however, it’s clear discontent hasn’t abated. Frustrations have grown for many due to what’s deemed gross governmental oppression. But almost everyone agrees that for now, with the state of emergency in place, there’s not much more they can do.

“Now it’s the fasting period before Easter, so people are praying even more and saying: Where are you God? Did you forget this land?” says Stefanos, who works in Gonder’s tourism industry, and didn’t want to give his name due to fear of arrest by the Command Post, the administrative body coordinating the state of emergency.

“Because people can’t protest, they are praying harder than ever.”

The four-month extension to the state of emergency contains less sweeping powers than before. Now police need warrants to arrest suspects or search their homes, and detention without trial has officially been ended. But grievances remain about what happened before.

“Someone will come and say they are with the Command Post and just tell you to go with them—you have no option but to obey,” Dawit, working in Gonder’s tourism industry, says of hundreds of locals arrested. “No one has any insurance of life.”
Outside Gonder churches, beggars line streets hoping for alms. Credit: James Jeffrey/IPS

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Thursday, April 6, 2017


Ethiopia: World Bank Ignores Land Grabbing

By Linda Flood

Stockholm — Sales of huge land areas of Ethiopia, by the Ethiopian government, to foreign investors, have led to starvation and forced displacement. In his documentary Dead Donkeys Fear no Hyenas, Swedish film director Joakim Demmer exposes the consequences of land grabbing, and holds the World Bank complicit.

The chase for this Green Gold started over ten years ago. Just before the global financial crisis, agricultural land areas in developing countries became a target for investment among global investors.
Joakim Demmer experienced first hand at the Addis Abeba airport how emergency food supplies was being unloaded while local food produce was being loaded for export.
"It was so odd. I started reading up on the subject and became aware of the extent foreign investors were striking deals all over the country.

Why Ethiopia is building a space programme

No body impressed while one-fifth of the country populations are starved and trying to start a space program is unheard of, why not first feed your people. And why not feed your people instead of taking his land, instead of keeping begging why not help the peasant to help himself and his country, I am sure the TPLF government foreign dollar paid advisers killing Ethiopian people on the broad day light


And why critics think it an odd use of scarce resources

THE ancient holy town of Lalibela, perched some 2,500 metres above sea-level in Ethiopia’s northern highlands, boasts some of the clearest night skies imaginable. Ethiopian stargazers dream that the mountains around Lalibela may one day host a world-class observatory to rival the big ones in Chile and Hawaii. And in time Ethiopia hopes to do more than just gaze at the stars. It would like to launch its own satellites, too.
In January the government said it would launch a Chinese-built civilian satellite from an overseas rocket pad within the next five years. It would be designed to Ethiopian specifications and used to monitor crops and the weather, and doubtless to spy on neighbours, too. The government also wants to reduce reliance on foreign telecoms by launching its own communications satellite.

In putting its own satellites into orbit Ethiopia would join the select club of African nations that have already done so. Nigeria has paid for the launch of five since 2003, some of which it says have helped fight terrorism. South Africa has also put several home-built satellites into space. Egypt launched two earth-observation ones, both of which have since failed; a private company, Nilesat, successfully operates communications ones. Kenya, Angola and Ghana are eager to join them.
Being able to beam communications or take photos from space offers some economic benefits. Ethiopia’s government hopes that mapping the country to help resolve land disputes, for instance, could boost agricultural productivity. And it could help with planning cities better. Investment in space science might also help speed up industrialisation, the government hopes.

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Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Why is Western media ignoring ongoing atrocity in Ethiopia?

She spoke to me with tears in her eyes describing the calculated execution of her own people. Even though Atsede Kazachew feels relatively safe as an Ethnic Amharic Ethiopian woman living inside the United States, she is grieving for all her fellow ethnic Ethiopians both Amharic and Omoro who have been mercilessly killed inside her own country.

“There is no one in the United States who understands,” outlined Atsede. “Why? Why?” she asked as her shaking hands were brought close to her face to hide her eyes.

The Irreecha Holy Festival is a hallowed annual celebration for North East Africa’s largest ethnic group, the Oromo people. Bringing together what has been counted as up to two million people, who live near and far away from the city of Bishoftu, the Irreecha Festival is a annual gathering of spiritual, social and religious significance. It is also a time to appreciate life itself as well as a celebration for the upcoming harvest in the rural regions.

Tragically on Sunday October 2, 2016 the event ended in what Ethiopia’s government said was 55 deaths but what locals described as up to 700 deaths and casualties.

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Monday, April 3, 2017

The Ethiopian government has extended a nationwide state of emergency for four months, hailing it as successful in restoring stability after almost a year of popular protests and crackdowns that cost hundreds of lives.

But while parts of Amhara, one of the hotbeds of the recent unrest, may be calm on the surface, IRIN found that major grievances remain unaddressed and discontent appears to be festering: There are even widespread reports that farmers in the northern region are engaged in a new, armed rebellion.

Human rights organisations and others have voiced concern at months of draconian government measures – some 20,000 people have reportedly been detained under the state of emergency, which also led to curfews, bans on public assembly, and media and internet restrictions.

“The regime has imprisoned, tortured and abused 20,000-plus young people and killed hundreds more in order to restore a semblance of order,” said Alemante Selassie, emeritus law professor at the College of William & Mary in the US state of Virginia. “Repression is the least effective means of creating real order in any society where there is a fundamental breach of trust between people and their rulers.”

The government line is far rosier.

“There’s been no negative effects,” Zadig Abrha, Ethiopia’s state minister for government communication affairs, told IRIN shortly before the measures were extended by four months, on 30 March.

“The state of emergency enabled us to focus on repairing the economic situation, compensating investors, and further democratising the nation… [and] allowed us to normalise the situation to how it was before, by enabling us to better coordinate security and increase its effectiveness.”

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Thursday, March 30, 2017

Ethiopia extends state of emergency by four months

That is the only way the government of Ethiopia knows using "FORCE" and Ethiopians rejected them on their face, the funny part, they said that the parliament is 100% vote for it and yet Ethiopia's parliament is 100 percent controlled by the ruling EPRDF/TPLF party. what a joke?



Opposition parties complain that the emergency is being used to clamp down on their members and activities.

The Ethiopian parliament has extended by four months a state of emergency it declared six months ago after almost a year of often violent anti-government demonstrations.

The widely expected extension comes amid reports of continued violence and anti-government activities in some rural areas.

At least 500 people were killed by security forces during the year of protests, according to New York-based Human Rights Watch group - a figure the government later echoed.

"We still have some anti-peace elements that are active and want to capitalise on disputes that arise among regional states in the country," Ethiopia's defence minister, Siraj Fegessa, told MPs when he called on them to approve the extension on Thursday.

"In addition, some leaders of the violent acts that we witnessed before are still at large and are disseminating wrong information to incite violence."

Opposition parties complain that the emergency powers are being used to clamp down on their members and activities, especially in rural regions far from the capital, Addis Ababa.

The state of emergency, declared on October 9, was a reaction to protests that were especially persistent in the Oromia region. Many members of the Oromo ethnic group say they are marginalised and that they do not have access to political power, something the government denies.

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Thursday, March 23, 2017

Ethiopia : Habtamu Ayalew Interview with VOA Amharic

Unbelievable the Ethiopian idiotic regime abusing human right and yet they have no shame to claim that they are working for Ethiopian